Archive for sea

Life Sized Octopus Backpack

Posted in accessories, craft, sea with tags , , , , on September 21, 2016 by shewalkssoftly

Although it’s certainly not the most practical accessory, I must admit I still checked to see if this life sized octopus backpack by Olga Kotova was for sale (it’s not…but I swear I would’ve had restraint!).


I’ve seen cutesy octopus bags before, but I admire her choice to throw caution to the wind and go for realism here.


Would you use this backpack just for the fun of it?


Olga Kotova

Desktop Goodies 8/24

Posted in absurd, anthropomorphic, Books, cats, comics, humor, illustration, nature, puppets, robots, sci-fi with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 24, 2016 by shewalkssoftly

I’ve been looking at a lot of historical nautical maps lately. What maps lacked in accuracy 500 years ago, they sure made up for with extravagant design. I’d be pretty thrilled if this guy showed up on my GPS.

Sadly, it’s pretty clear that “solitudes” has a double meaning here.

I don’t think this is what she meant by “Calgon, take me away!”

Actually, he said you guys were more like acquaintances. Just sayin’.


DY-NO-MITE! Actual mites, I mean.

You mean cats can saw wood and build things while mine have been eating and sleeping all day? Freaking freeloaders.
7 (1)

Speaking of cats…

That new fertilizer did wonders for the harvest.
7 (2)

Ugh. One of those evenings.

This requires careful planning.

I stared at this for like five minutes in a futile attempt to decide which one is creepier.

Juan Jose Surace

Posted in art, monsters, sea with tags , , , , , on August 13, 2016 by shewalkssoftly

How about some marvelous monsters and other strange goodies? Today I bring you the captivating creatures of Juan Jose Surace.

At least on my computer screen, these are showing up very small, so definitely click to enlarge. You don’t want to miss the details of these…aquatic bereaved.

…or this fellow.



Juan Jose Surace

Lisha’s Body Art

Posted in art, body decoration, makeup, sea, skulls and skeletons, undead with tags , , , , , , on July 17, 2016 by shewalkssoftly

Lisha’s Body Art is the work of Lisha Simpson. She paints some fantastic cut-out illusions on her own hand!





Lisha’s Body Art

Meredith Woolnough Embroidery

Posted in craft, nature, sea with tags , , , on July 2, 2016 by shewalkssoftly

Yes, this is embroidery!


Meredith Woolnough sews intricate leaves, coral and other forms found in nature on her sewing machine with a special fabric that dissolves in water, leaving only the gorgeously fragile skeleton of the design.


I love the way she mounts them on a crisp white background to show the subtle shadows.



Meredith Woolnough

Nanami Cowdroy

Posted in art, sea with tags , on April 30, 2016 by shewalkssoftly

Nanami Cowdroy creates gorgeously detailed, lively monochromatic paintings.


Her pieces are whimsical, elaborate and imaginative, often combining mismatched elements.


She was born in Sydney, but has also been deeply influenced by her Japanese heritage. The magic happens where the two intersect.

From the artist bio:
Referring to Tokyo as “a big concrete mass,” she says she finds the lack of space and the size of its population ultimately incredibly inspiring. “What could be viewed as ‘ugly’ like tangled up power lines, cramped alleys and gritty streets, I feel has it’s own ‘raw’ appeal … as it’s not trying to cover up anything.”


In contrast, Sydney is her complementary muse and a fitting balance to the mega metropolis of Tokyo. “We’re lucky to have such great open spaces, and leafy areas in and around the city. It’s not that hard to find a place to sit down and take a break, or catch a breathe away from the concrete shadows.”


We also see fish and sea creatures recurring in her work. Cowdroy sees them as the ultimate embodiment of contrast; “elegant and quirky, delicate yet spirited.”


Nanami Cowdroy

Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka: Sea Creature Glass Models

Posted in antiques, glass, photography, sea with tags , , , , on April 27, 2016 by shewalkssoftly

Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka were a German father and son glass sculpting team who created stunning, detailed biological models in the 1800’s.


As a child, Leopold was a apprenticed to a goldsmith and gem cutter. He then gained experience in the family business making glass ornaments and glass eyes, during which time he developed a technique which he termed “glass-spinning” (allowing highly precise works in glass).


His son Rudolph assisted him in making 131 marine invertebrate models in a single year (circa 1880), and after a great deal of effort and prodding by proprietor George Lincoln Goodale, their work ended up in the Harvard Botanical museum.

I wonder how many of these beauties are surviving today. These photos are taken from Guido Mofacio’s photography exhibit, on display at Hamilton’s Gallery until May 24th, 2016.